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20121001
20121009
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the issue of access. it is -- it is preand commercial free environment and it is -- it is -- universally accessible to anyone with a television which is nnch this country. and if you can't afford cable, if you can't afford premium content, you can rely on the public broadcasting service. is pbs perfect? no. have they provided through their children's programming for almost 50 years some of the finest educational content worldwide for our nation's children? absolutely. does it deserve to be on the chopping block? >> that's the word i was looking for. chopping block. thank you for helping me out. >> chopping block. here is -- here's something i would like to point out, soledad. i know in this current economic climate we have to make different choices. however, i was raised by a woman whose philosophy it was to give her children the best education she could not afford. do you understand what i'm saying? >> value in the free. >> we have to make the investment in our children if we expect for them to pay off on that investment through their realizing their most full potential. so there are pl
energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. . . >> clayton: all right. 50 years ago this week, the world's most famous spy hit the big screen. >> i admire your luck, mr. -- >> bond, james bond. >> my name is bond, james bond. >> when was the last shipment? >> oh, lazzenby, i'm sorry. >> alisyn: and a half century later the most celebrated spy, in the movies he has it better than spies in real life. he was an of james bond, an mi-6, and spy catcher novel, dunn, matthew dunn. >> clayton: matthew, welcome to the show. >> good morning. >> clayton: it looks glamorous, bond over the years. help us separate fact from fiction here, although i think we might prefer the fiction side of it, but you guys are in the trenches doing the real deal.
preparing and understand the environment and we are inserted in to the environment. we are raising additional forces to you know react to the government or we are doing counter terrorism. >> brian: bin laden is dead . sadly al-qaida isn't. what should we know about the state of the main enemy. >> they regenerate and we killed many, many leaderships of al-qaida and they continue on. >> brian: we want to support what you do. and a lot of people want to support. how do we do it? >> support the green beret foundation at greenberetfoundation.org. we have many events and partnered with the pga and do special shooting events and puts corporate partners with the green berets. we do a lot of things. >> brian: thank you for what you have done. master sergeant scott neal thank you so much. meanwhile coming up straight ahead. they both promised to fight for the middle class. which cand date made the stronger case. and a story for all business travelers out there. a suitcase for people who are too lazy or tire to pull it behind them. happy birthday to my high school class mate john, he's 50 tod
political environment. but at the same time, you spent years as the democratic party chair, in some ways, being the partisan chief of the party. what would you say to virginians that would convince them that when you go to washington, you'd be not partisan and not simply a loyal lieutenant in harry reid's army. >> i will tell you two things. i served with two presidents. i serve with president bush and president obama. we did not agree on everything. i worked closely on the bush administration on a number of issues that put virginia first. railroads are being built right now largely because of president bush and his secretary of transportation and our ability to work together. we worked with the bush administration in the aftermath of the shootings at virginia tech. i will always be a partner of the nine states, whoever the president is. i also have a track record of working across lines. first, here in richmond. second, as a republican -- as a governor with republican houses. we were the best-managed state in virginia. revested for business all years i was governor, forbes magazine. tho
that it's an a austere environment and it's not safe. my answer to that is you do what you have to to make sure that it is safe so you can conduct your investigation. you ask your guys on the ground what is needed to secure that area and you do it immediately. to me there is no other acceptable course of action regarding it. martha: what do you think -- the more you learn about the details of that night, and that your two former colleagues were half a mile away in another location, and that this action apparently moved from the consulate where ambassador stevens was to the area half a mile away where they were and they got drawn into this. what does that tell you from your experience? >> from an operative's perspective it absolutely tells me there was a number of individuals utilized in the attack, without question, in my opinion, it was preplanned and it needs to be coordinated at a petty high level. so it's not something that is easy to pull off based on the fact that there was multiple locations, good distances apart, for sure that they had pretty reliable intelligence on what was going
south and east, that we could have created an environment where we could leave and have them capable of carrying out their continued counterinsurgency missions. the fact is, al qaeda is on the rise throughout the middle east. the fact is that they believe that we are weak. they believe we are withdrawing. i talk to these leaders all over the middle east. and this is part of that scenario. look at what's happened in iraq. over 4,000 young americans, and we now have al qaeda on the comeback. anyway, go ahead, willie. >> history is what it is, senator. i think a lot of us wish we weren't in afghanistan anymore, that we hadn't lost 2,000 lives. >> but there was a way out. it's not as if it was an impossible situation. almost all of us agree there was a way that we could have succ d succeeded. >> fair enough, but we are where we are. so what would you do today? why would another year, five years, ten years change afghanistan? >> i would make a decision as to whether we had a significant number of troops listening to my military leadership to remain there to carry out an environment where
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)